Methods to verify the identity of an individual and confirm the existence of a corporation or an entity other than a corporation

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October 2019

The requirement to verify the identity of an individual and confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA) and associated Regulations applies to all reporting entities (REs).

This document answers the following questions:

  1. What does it mean to verify the identity of an individual or to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation?
  2. How do I verify the identity of an individual?
  3. How do I use an affiliate, agent, or mandatary?
  4. How do I identify a child?
  5. How do I confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation?
  6. Are there restrictions on the use of personal information?

This document contains five annexes:

1. What does it mean to verify the identity of an individual or to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation?

The Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Regulations (PCMLTFR) specify how and when you must identify an individual or confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation for the purpose of ensuring that the information in the identification documents or from other informational sources corresponds to what the individual or entity provided to you.

The point at which you identify an individual or confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation will depend on the activity or transaction being carried out.

*Note: For specific information on when (the timing requirement) to verify the identity of an individual or confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation, see your sector's guidance on When to identify individuals and confirm the existence of entities.

2. How do I verify the identity of an individual?

There are three ways that you can verify the identity of an individual:

a. Government-issued photo identification documents

A government-issued photo identification document must be issued by either a federal, provincial or territorial government in order to be used to verify the identity of an individual. You may accept a foreign government-issued photo identification document if it is an equivalent to a Canadian document such as those listed in this guidance. Photo identification documents issued by municipal governments, Canadian or foreign, are not acceptable. For examples of acceptable government-issued photo identification documents please refer to Annex 4.

The photo identification document must:

  1. indicate the individual's name;
  2. include a photo of the individual;
  3. include a unique identifying number; and
  4. match the name and appearance of the individual being identified.

You can determine the authenticity of a government-issued photo identification document in person by looking at the characteristics of the original physical document and its security features (or markers, as applicable) in the presence of the individual to be satisfied that it is authentic as issued by the competent authority (federal, provincial, territorial government) that is valid (unaltered, not counterfeit) and current (not expired).

If an individual is not physically present, the authenticity of a government-issued photo identification document must be determined by using a technology capable of assessing the document's authenticity. For example:

When an individual is not physically present, you must still determine if the individual presenting the government-issued photo identification document matches the name and photo of the person in the authenticated document provided. For example:

*Note: It is not enough to just view a person and their government-issued photo identification document online through a video conference or any other type of virtual application. You must use a software or some type of technology that would be able to authenticate the government-issued photo identification document.  You must also verify that the name and image match that of the individual on the authentic government-issued photo identification document.

Your compliance program's policies and procedures must describe the processes you follow to authenticate a government-issued photo identification document, whether in person or not, and how you will confirm that it is valid and current. Your policies and procedures must also describe the steps used to verify that the name and photograph are those of the individual. The processes for an RE to determine that a government-issued photo identification document is authentic, valid and current, and the verification step (ensuring that the name and picture matches the name and face of the person), do not need to happen concurrently. It is up to you to determine how you complete these two separate steps.

What information needs to be recorded when using the government-issued photo identification document method?

If you are using the government-issued photo identification document method, you must recordFootnote 7:

  1. the individual's name;
  2. the date on which you verified the individual's identity;
  3. the type of document used (for example, driver's licence, passport, etc.);
  4. the unique identifying number of the document used;
  5. the jurisdiction (province or state) and country that issued the document; and
  6. the expiry date of the document, if available (if the information appears on the document or card, you must record it).

b. Credit file method

To be deemed an acceptable method, the credit file mustFootnote 8:  

  1. be from a Canadian credit bureau (credit files from foreign credit bureaus are not acceptable);
  2. have been in existence for at least three years; and
  3. match the name, address and date of birth that the individual provided.

A credit file provides a rating on an individual's ability to repay loans; however, it is possible to request a credit file to verify an individual's identifying information that does not include a credit assessment. You do not need a credit assessment to verify the identity of an individual. Equifax Canada and TransUnion Canada are Canadian credit bureaus that provide credit file information for identification purposes.

To rely on the credit file method, you must conduct the search at the time you are verifying the individual's identity. An individual cannot provide you with a copy of their credit file, nor can a previously obtained credit file be used (see section 3 for situations where information that had been obtained by an affiliate, agent, or mandatary may be used).

It is acceptable to use an automated system to match the individual's information with the information contained in the individual's credit file. You may also rely on a third party vendor to provide you with valid and current information contained in the individual's credit file. A third party vendor is an entity that is authorized by a Canadian credit bureau to provide access to Canadian credit information.

If any of the information provided by the individual (name, address, or date of birth) does not match the information in the credit file, you cannot use that credit file to verify the identity of this individual. You will need to use another source or method to verify the individual's identity.

On occasion, information found within the credit file may contain a variation of the name or a discrepancy in the address that was provided to you by the individual. In these instances, you must determine whether the information in the credit file is a match to the information collected from the individual. For example:

What information needs to be recorded when using the credit file method?

If you use this method, you must recordFootnote 9:

  1. the individual's name;
  2. the date you consulted or searched the credit file;
  3. the name of the Canadian credit bureau or third party vendor holding the credit file; and
  4. the individual's credit file number.

Your compliance program's policies and procedures must describe the processes you follow to use the credit file method to verify an individual's identity and how you will ensure that the information is valid and current. It should also include the steps you will take if the information is not valid and current (for example, search a different credit file, use another method, stop the transaction, etc.).

c. Dual-process method to verify the identity of an individual

You can verify the identity of an individual using the dual-process method. This method involves referring to information from two reliable sources.

How to use the dual process method to verify the identity of an individual

To verify an individual's identity by using the dual-process methodFootnote 10, you must refer to any two of the following:

Information for this purpose may be found in statements, letters, certificates, forms or other sources and can be provided through an original version or you may obtain another version of the information's original format, such as a fax, photocopy, scan, or electronic image. For further clarity, it is acceptable to rely on a fax, photocopy, scan or electronic image of a government-issued photo identification document as one of the two sources of information required to verify the identity of an individual.

The information you obtain must originate from two different sources and cannot come from the individual whose identity is being verified nor can it come from the person or entity doing the verificationFootnote 11. The name, address, date of birth or confirmation of a deposit account, credit card or other loan account must match the information that was provided by the individual.

*Note: It is not acceptable to rely on information if the account number or number that is associated with the information is truncated or redacted. On occasion, information contained in a source may contain a variation of the name or a typo in the address. In these instances, you must determine whether the information matches the information collected from the individual. If it is a slight typo in the address or a misspelled name, you may determine that the information still matches what the individual provided. However, in the case of an incorrect date of birth, it is more likely that you will determine that the information does not match. In this case, you cannot rely on the information referred to in these two sources for identification purposes. An alternative source or method (government-issued photo identification or credit file) to verify the individual's identity must be used or you must obtain a different source under the dual process method.

You cannot use the same source for the two categories of information you use to verify the individual's identity. For example, you cannot rely on a bank statement from Bank A that includes the individual's name and address and another bank statement from Bank A that includes the individual's name and confirms that the individual holds a deposit account, as Bank A would be the originating source of both categories of information. You can, however, refer to a bank statement from Bank A that contains the individual's name and confirms that the individual holds a deposit account, and rely on an electronic image of a driver's licence to verify the individual's name and address. For further precision:

  1. You refer to one reliable source to verify an individual's name and address, and refer to a different reliable source to verify their name and date of birth.
  2. You refer to one reliable source to verify an individual's name and address, and refer to a different source to verify their name and confirm a financial account (specifically a deposit account, credit card account or loan account).
  3. You refer to one reliable source to verify an individual's name and date of birth, and refer to a different source to verify their name and confirm a financial account (specifically, a deposit account, credit card account or loan account).

What is a reliable source of information?

A reliable source is an originator or issuer of information that you trust. To be considered reliable, the source should be well known and considered reputable. For example, a reliable source could be the federal, provincial, territorial or municipal levels of government, crown corporations, federally regulated financial institutions, or utility providers. See Annex 5 for a table outlining examples of reliable sources of information for the dual process method.

* Note: If the information (two of either of the following: name and address, name and date of birth, or name and confirmation of a deposit account, credit card or other loan account) you obtain through the identification process does not match the information provided by the individual, you cannot rely on it. Social media of any kind is not an acceptable source of information to verify an individual's identity.

If you have already verified the identity of an individual, you do not need to re-verify it upon subsequent account openings or transactions, unless you have doubts about the accuracy of the information that was used at the time of verificationFootnote 12.

How to use a credit file under the dual process method to verify the identity of an individual

A Canadian credit file can be used as one of the two sources of information required to verify the identity of an individual. It can be used to verify the individual's name and address, name and date of birth, or to verify the individual's name and confirm that the individual has a deposit account, credit card or loan account. The credit file must have existed for at least six months.

Information from a second source, for example, a property tax assessment, must be used to verify the second category of information under the dual process method. In this instance, the two reliable sources are the Canadian credit bureau that provided the credit file information and the municipal government that issued the property tax assessment. The information from these two sources must match the information provided by the individual.

You can rely on information from a Canadian credit bureau if it acts as an aggregator and if it compiles information from different reliable sources (often referred to as tradelines). In this instance, the Canadian credit bureau must provide you with information from two independent tradelines that verify two of either: the individual's name and address, the individual's name and date of birth, or the individual's name and confirmation of a deposit account, credit card or loan account. In this instance, each tradeline is a distinct source; the credit bureau is not the source.

The tradelines cannot be your own, as the reporting entity verifying the individual's identity, and each tradeline must originate from a different source (for example, federally regulated financial institution, utility service provider, etc.).

What information needs to be recorded when using the dual-process method?

There is specific information you must keep if you use this method to verify an individual's identity. You must have the following information in your recordsFootnote 13:

  1. the individual's name;
  2. the date you verified the information;
  3. the name of the two different sources that were used to verify the identity of the individual;
  4. the type of information consulted (for example, utility statement, bank statement, marriage licence); and
  5. the number associated with the information (for example, account number or if there is no account number, a number that is associated with the information, which could be a reference number or certificate number, etc.).
    If you receive two distinct sources from an aggregator of that information, you must record the tradeline account number or number associated to each tradeline, not the aggregator number.

Your compliance program's policies and procedures must describe the processes you follow when using the dual process method to verify an individual's identity and how you will ensure that the information is valid and current.

3. How do I use an affiliate, agent or mandatary?

To verify the identity of an individual, you can rely on:

The affiliates, agents and mandataries you rely on to verify the identity of individuals must have done their verification in accordance with the PCMLTFR as they were written at the time of the verification. You are legally responsible for verifying client identity, even if you rely on someone else to do it. If you have any concerns about the methods or information that your affiliates, agents, or mandataries used to verify an individual's identity, you should re-verify their identityFootnote 17.

In the case of a business merger or acquisition, you are not required to re-identify the acquired clients, if their identities were verified in accordance with the PCMLTFA and associated Regulations at the time the verification took place. As a best practice, you are encouraged to review and update client information (for example, name, address, date of birth, etc.), as determined by your risk assessment process. Newly acquired clients become the responsibility of the acquiring entity; it must ensure compliance with the PCMLTFA and associated Regulations, and review any risks that these clients may pose to the entity and the Canadian financial system.

Affiliates

What are domestic and foreign affiliates?

An entity is an affiliate of another entity if one of them is wholly owned by the other, if both are wholly owned by the same entity or if their financial statements are consolidatedFootnote 18.

To rely on your domestic affiliates for identification purposes, they must meet the definition of a bank, authorized foreign bank, cooperative credit society, savings and credit union, caisse populaire, life insurance company, trust company, loan company, or securities dealer. In other words, your domestic affiliates must be recognized as an entity under paragraphs 5(a) to (g)Footnote 19 of the PCMLTFA.

To rely on your foreign affiliates for identification purposes, they must carry out activities outside of Canada that are similar to the activities of a person or entity referred to in paragraphs 5(a) to (g) of the PCMLTFAFootnote 20.

What is a financial entity that is a member of your financial services cooperative or credit union central?

Financial services cooperatives or credit union centrals act on behalf of a membership composed of financial entities and can provide financial services to that group.

A financial services cooperative is regulated by the Act respecting financial services cooperatives.

A credit union central is a central cooperative credit society under the Cooperative Credit Associations Act or a credit union central, federation of credit unions, or caisses populaires regulated by provincial Acts outside of Québec.

You can rely on a member of your financial services cooperative or credit union central to verify the identity of an individualFootnote 21.

How can an affiliate or a member of the same financial services cooperative or credit union central be used to verify the identity of individuals?

To rely on a domestic affiliate, foreign affiliate or a member of the same financial services cooperative or credit union central to verify the identity of an individual, you mustFootnote 22:

What information needs to be recorded when you rely on an affiliate to verify the identity of an individual?

When you rely on an affiliate to verify the identity of an individual, you must recordFootnote 23:

  1. the individual's name;
  2. the date on which the affiliate verified the identity of the individual;
  3. the name of the affiliate that verified the individual's identity:
  4. the method that the affiliate used to verify the individual's identity; and
  5. the information that the affiliate recorded based on the method it used.

* Note: If the affiliate verified the identity of the individual in accordance with the methods to verify identity that were in force prior to June 2017, you must record:

Agent or mandatary

How can an agent or mandatary be used to verify the identity of an individualFootnote 25?

You can rely on an agent or mandatary to carry out your obligation to verify the identity of an individual, or you can verify the identity of an individual by relying on the measures previously taken by an agent or mandatary if they were:

Whether you use an agent or mandatary to verify the identity of an individual on your behalf, or you rely on the measures previously taken by an agent or mandatary you mustFootnote 26:

Example 1 – Acceptable

Jane Smith would like to open an account with you. The agent verified Jane Smith's identity, in 2012, by referring to her driver's licence, which expired in February 2014. In 2012, because Jane Smith's name and photograph matched with that on the driver's licence, her identity was verified in accordance with the prescribed methods - regardless that the licence is now expired. As such, to rely on the information from this agent is acceptable, providing there is an agreement in place to do so, and you will obtain the prescribed information, as soon as feasible.

Example 2 – Unacceptable

Jane Smith (maiden name – Jane Rogers) would like to carry out a transaction for which you must verify her identity. The agent verified Jane Rogers' identity, in 2012, by referring to her driver's licence, which has not yet expired. In 2012, because Jane Rogers' name and photograph matched with that on the driver's licence, her identity was verified in accordance with the prescribed methods. However, regardless that the licence has not yet expired, it is not acceptable to rely on the information from this agent, because the agent will provide you information on Jane Rogers, and she is now Jane Smith, so the information provided to you by the agent will not be valid and current.

Example 3 – Unacceptable

Jane Smith would like to carry out a transaction for which you must verify her identity. The agent verified Jane Smith's identity, in 2012, by referring to her driver's licence, which expired in 2011. In 2012, because Jane Smith's driver's licence had expired, her identity WAS NOT verified in accordance with the prescribed methods. As such, it is not acceptable to rely on the information from this agent.

What information needs to be recorded when you rely on an agent or mandatary to verify the identity of an individual?

In addition to the applicable records associated with the prescribed identification method, if you rely on an agent or mandatary to verify the identity of an individual, you must have the following in your recordsFootnote 29:

4. How do I identify a child?

If a child is under 12 years of age, you must verify the identity of one parent or guardian and record the parent or guardian's information. You can rely on the information provided by the parent, guardian, or tutor in order to record the child's identification detailsFootnote 30.

If a child is between 12 and 15 years of age, you can verify their identity directly by using one of the prescribed methods to verify an individual's identity.

If this is not possible, you can rely on one source of information that includes the name and address of the child's parent, guardian, or tutorFootnote 31 and a second source that includes the child's name and date of birth. For example, if the child has a passport you can use it to verify their identity, if not, you could rely on the parent's driver's licence to verify their common address and the child's birth certificate to verify the child's name and date of birth.

5. How do I confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation?

An entity can be a corporation, trust, partnership, fund, or unincorporated association or organization. However, corporations are subject to different requirements than entities other than corporations.

Corporations

To confirm the existence of a corporation, you can refer to a paper record or an electronic record that was obtained from a source that is accessible to the publicFootnote 32, such as:

You can obtain a corporation's name and address and the names of its directors from a provincial or federal database such as the Corporations Canada database, which is accessible from Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. You may also get this type of information if you subscribe to a corporation searching and registration service.

You must verify the corporation's name, address and the names of its directors. In the case of a corporation that is a securities dealer, you do not need to verify the names of its directors when you confirm its existenceFootnote 33.

You do not have to re-confirm the existence of a corporation nor to verify the corporation's name, address and the names of its directors unless you have doubts about the accuracy of the information or the record usedFootnote 34.

An entity other than a corporation

To confirm the existence of an entity, other than a corporation, you can refer to a paper record or an electronic record that was obtained from a source that is accessible to the publicFootnote 35, such as:

You do not have to re-confirm the existence of an entity unless you have doubts about the accuracy of the information or the record usedFootnote 36.  

Records required when confirming the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation

If you refer to a publicly accessible electronic record to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation, you must keep a record of:

If you consult a paper record to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation, you must retain the record or a copy of the recordFootnote 39.

6. Are there restrictions on the use of personal information?

The use of personal information in Canadian commercial activities is protected by the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), or by similar provincial legislation. You have to inform clients about the collection of their personal information. However, you do not have to inform them when you include their personal information in the reports you are required to submit to FINTRAC.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada can provide further guidance, and has created a Question and Answer document about PIPEDA and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, to help clarify your responsibilities under both federal Acts.

For further information, please contact FINTRAC.

Annex 1: Summary of the methods to verify the identity of individuals and associated record keeping obligations

Annex 1: Summary of the methods to verify the identity of individuals and associated record keeping obligations
Identification method Documents or information to review Identification details that must match Information that must be recorded
Photo identification Photo identification document issued by a government that is authentic, valid and current Name and photograph
  • Individual's name
  • Date of verification
  • Type of document
  • Document number
  • Province or state and country that issued the document
  • Expiry date (if applicable)
Credit file Valid and current information from a Canadian credit file that has been in existence for at least three years Name, address and date of birth
  • Individual's name
  • Date you consulted/searched the credit file
  • Name of the credit bureau
  • Individual's credit file number
Dual process Valid and current information from two reliable sources A combination of two of the following:
name and address;
name and date of birth; or
name and confirmation of a financial account
  • Individual's name
  • Date you verified the information
  • Name of the two different sources used to verify the identity of the individual
  • Type of information consulted
  • Account number or number associated with the information

Annex 2: Summary of who can identify an individual on your behalf

Annex 2: Summary of who can identify an individual on your behalf
Who Documents or information to review Identification details that must match Information that must be recorded
Affiliate that verified the identity of the individual:
  • a domestic affiliate;
  • a foreign affiliate; or
  • a member of the same financial services cooperative or credit union central.
Verify that the name, address and date of birth in the affiliate's records are those of the individual;
or
Where the identity was verified prior to June 17, 2017, the information that would have been required in accordance with the requirements at that time
The identification details listed under the identification method used at the time of the verification
  • Individual's name
  • Date of verification
  • Name of the entity that previously verified the individual's identity
  • Identification method used to verify the individual's identity
  • Information gathered according to the identification method that was used at the time of the verification
Agent or mandatary that:
  • acted in their own capacity;
  • acted for you; or
  • acted as an agent or mandatary under a written agreement or arrangement with another person or entity for the purposes of verifying identity
Verify that the information is valid and current when you receive it and that the individual's identity was verified using one of the prescribed identification methods;
or
Where the identity was verified prior to June 17, 2017, that the information was valid and current at that time, and that the individual's identity was verified using one of the prescribed identification methods at that time.
The identification details listed under the identification method used at the time of the verification
  • A written agreement or arrangement with the agent or mandatary for the purpose of verifying an individual's identity
  • All of the information that the agent or mandatary consulted when verifying the individual's identity
  • The information that the agent or mandatary verified as being that of the individual

Annex 3: Summary of how to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation

Annex 3: Summary of how to confirm the existence of a corporation or of an entity other than a corporation
Type of entity Documents to review Identification details that must match Information that must be recorded
Corporation

Documents that you can rely on to confirm the existence of a corporation:

  • certificate of incorporation
  • certificate of corporate status
  • record that has to be filed annually under provincial securities legislation
  • published annual report signed by an audit firm
  • letter or notice of assessment from a municipal, provincial, territorial or federal government

Name and address of corporation

Names of Directors

If you consulted an electronic record:

  • registration number;
  • type of document consulted; and
  • source of the electronic document

If you consulted a paper record:

  • the paper record, or a copy of the record
Entity other than a corporation

Documents that you can rely on to confirm the existence of an entity other than a corporation:

  • a partnership agreement
  • articles of association
  • any other similar record that confirms the existence of the entity
  • letter or notice of assessment from a municipal, provincial, territorial or federal government
Name and address of the entity

If you consulted an electronic record:

  • registration number;
  • type of record consulted; and
  • source of the electronic record

If you consulted a paper record:

  • the paper record, or a copy of the record

Annex 4: Examples of acceptable photo identification documents

The following list provides examples of acceptable government-issued photo identification documents from federal, provincial or territorial authorities. This is not an exhaustive list.

Annex 4: Examples of acceptable photo identification documents
Type of card or document Issuing province or state and country
Canadian passport Canada
Permanent resident card Canada
Citizenship card (issued prior to 2012) Canada
Secure Certificate of Indian Status Canada
Driver's licences
British Columbia Driver's Licence British Columbia, Canada
Alberta Driver's Licence Alberta, Canada
Saskatchewan Driver's Licence Saskatchewan, Canada
Manitoba Driver's Licence Manitoba, Canada
Ontario Driver's Licence Ontario, Canada
Québec Driver's Licence Québec, Canada
New Brunswick Driver's Licence New Brunswick, Canada
Nova Scotia Driver's Licence Nova Scotia, Canada
Prince Edward Island Driver's Licence Prince Edward Island, Canada
Newfoundland and Labrador Driver's Licence Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Yukon Driver's Licence Yukon, Canada
Northwest Territories Driver's Licence Northwest Territories, Canada
Nunavut Driver's Licence Nunavut, Canada
DND 404 Driver's Licence Department of National Defence, Canada
Provincial services cards
British Columbia Services Card British Columbia, Canada
Provincial or territorial identity cards
British Columbia Enhanced ID British Columbia, Canada
Alberta Photo Identification Card Alberta, Canada
Saskatchewan Non-driver photo ID Saskatchewan, Canada
Manitoba Enhanced Identification Card Manitoba, Canada
Ontario Photo Card Ontario, Canada
New Brunswick Photo ID Card New Brunswick, Canada
Nova Scotia Identification Card Nova Scotia, Canada
Prince Edward Island Voluntary ID Prince Edward Island, Canada
Newfoundland and Labrador Photo Identification Card Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
Northwest Territories General Identification Card Northwest Territories, Canada
Nunavut General Identification Card Nunavut, Canada
Types of card or international document
Global Entry Card United States
NEXUS United States or Canada
France driver's licence France
Australian passport Australia
Pennsylvania driver's licence Pennsylvania, United States

* Note: You cannot use a provincial health card for identification purposes where it is prohibited by provincial legislation.

Annex 5: Examples of reliable sources of information for the dual-process method

This is not an exhaustive list. You must always rely on valid and current information whether it be through an original version or whether you obtain another version of the information's original format, such as a fax, photocopy, scan, or electronic image.  

Annex 5: Examples of reliable sources of information for the dual-process method
Reliable sources of information to verify name and address Reliable sources of information to verify name and date of birth Reliable sources of information to verify name and confirm a financial account (specifically a deposit account, credit card account or loan account)

Issued by a Canadian government body:

  • A fax, photocopy, scan or electronic image of a government-issued photo identification document
  • Any statement, form, certificate or other source issued by a Canadian government body (federal, provincial, territorial or municipal):
    • Canada Pension Plan (CPP) statement
    • Property tax assessment issued by a municipality
    • Provincially issued vehicle registration
  • Benefits statement:
    • Federal, provincial, territorial, or municipal levels

Issued by other Canadian sources

  • Utility bill (for example, electricity, water, telecommunications)
  • Canada 411
  • Record of Employment
  • Registered investment account statements (for example, RRSP, TFSA or RRIF)
  • Canadian credit file that has been in existence for at least six months
  • Product from a Canadian credit bureau or other third party (containing two trade lines in existence for at least six months)
  • Insurance documents (home, auto, life)

Issued by a Canadian government body:

  • A fax, photocopy, scan or electronic image of a government-issued photo identification document
  • Any statement, form, certificate or other source issued by a Canadian government body (federal, provincial, territorial or municipal):
    • Birth certificate
    • Marriage certificate or government-issued proof of marriage document (long-form which includes date of birth)
    • Divorce documentation
    • Permanent resident card
    • Citizenship certificate
    • Temporary driver's licence (non-photo)

Issued by other Canadian sources

  • Canadian credit file that has been in existence for at least six months
  • Product from a Canadian credit bureau (containing two trade lines in existence for at least six months)
  • Investment account statements (for example, RRSP, GIC)
  • Insurance documents (home, auto, life)

Issued by a foreign government

  • Travel visa

Confirm that the individual has a deposit account, credit card or loan account by means of:

  • Credit card statement
  • Bank statement for deposit or chequing accounts
  • Loan account statement (for example, mortgage)
  • Cheque that has been processed in the last statement period (cleared, insufficient funds) by a financial institution
  • Telephone call, email, letter, or other traceable means of confirmation from the financial entity holding the deposit account, credit card or loan account.
  • Product from a Canadian credit bureau (containing two trade lines in existence for at least six months)
  • Use of micro-deposits
Date Modified: